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Amazon Drone, The Purple Cow, and Marketing

Jeff Bezos of Amazon demonstrated a masterful control of public relations by appearing on "60 Minutes" and announcing Amazon's intent to create delivery drones. Couch potatoes of the world immediately leaned forward at their TV's or streaming Internet devices in cheers: now, popcorn and candy bars could be delivered via the air, in mere hours... Making it every more unnecessary to get up off the coach.

Amazon Drones and Purple Cows


Marketing Guru Seth Godin in his book, Purple Cow, argues that the ordinary is risky, but the extraordinary - the Purple Cow - at the edge of the road is not only the thing that will make you stop but the thing that will sell more...  What?  Stuff.
Amazon Drones, Purple Cows, and Marketing

Amazon's drones may make it to the real world, or not. But in the day before "Cyber Monday" to be featured on "60 Minutes" and to be able to garner massive FREE public relations' buzz about delivery drones...  That was priceless (to use another marketing slogan).

Why Care?


But who cares? You do.  Why? Because Amazon drones and Purple Cows teach you something about marketing your own stuff.  What is your "Purple Cow?" What is your over-the-top excuse for massive publicity and buzz... What is your "Amazon Drone" that can get them talking, even if it isn't a real product, even if it never will be, but even if your Cyber Monday is tomorrow?

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