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Customer Service at Bing or Lack Thereof

Just spoke with Bing technical support.  Where do we start on my wish list? Let's start with last names and phone numbers at Bing advertising support.


  1. Wouldn't it be wonderful if people who worked at big companies had last names? Where do they find all these people who are just like Cher or Adele? No one has a last name, which makes them tough to find when you need to follow up (and don't want to have to explain, again, what your issue is).
  2. Wouldn't it be wonderful if people who worked at big companies had their own phone number? If Bing would swing for a phone system, then you or I could actually call these people back, directly, as opposed to having to email them first and then have them call us.
Those are the technical issues that would make our life so much better vis-a-vis Bing. Of course, it's not just Bing. It's most large companies - including Credit Card companies - where employees a) lack last names, and b) lack phone numbers. I believe it is the same at Google AdWords, and I know it is the same at Chase and Bank of America.



No wonder corporate America is suffering!

Let's all chip in and see if we can at least help Corporate America afford phone numbers for their employees in customer service and tech support. And, let's all begin a letter-writing campaign to Cher and Adele asking them to give out their last names, or at least stop being role models for the people who work in call centers.

I get the fact that I shouldn't be able to call Adele directly. But the fact that I can't call Christopher at Bing technical support directly is pretty bizarre. And he doesn't have a last name - so if he were to fall in love with my daughter, and get married, I guess he could take her last name. Christopher McDonald, it has a nice ring to it (but then I think he'd have to quit his job at Bing where they only hire people like Cher or Adele).

Who knows? Hello. It's me. Hello from the other side, Bing - the side where people have last names, and phone numbers, and believe that a company should make it easy for a customer to follow up on a technical issue.

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