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Google: The One Trick Pony

Today's New York Times has an article about the frustration of Wall Street with Google. Frustration? How can that be?  Google is a "cash cow," racking in dollar after dollar via AdWords. But there is reason for frustration - a lot - because beneath the surface, Google is actually doing a very poor job as a company. The company has one, and only one, serious source of revenue: AdWords. And that revenue largely comes from the desktop.


Other Attempts to Make Money: Not Working

Google's Cash Cow

Other attempts by Google are not making money.  My favorite to kick: Google Glass.  No money there, and really no real traction for those silly glasses.  Or self-driving cars. We aren't even close to the age of the Jettisons!

But what really really irks me is Google Places!  First it was Google Local, and then it was Google Places, and then it was Google+ Local, and now it's Google My Business.  Google has a GOLDEN opportunity with local to compete with the likes of Yelp - form a real community of Googlers sharing opinions about products and services...  But the interface is terribly difficult to use, the customer service non-existent, AdWords express is a bear to work with.  We could go on.


Time for New Management at Google?


So Google - a "genius" company if there ever was one - is missing the most obvious golden opportunity for new revenue - Google+ Local... and instead focusing on Google Glass, self-driving cars, and what was it - Oh yes, Internet access via balloons.  If I were a shareholder - I, too - would be Googling "new managment"  (Sorry Eric).

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